Posted Sunday, August 31, 2014 - 2:56pm by Clayton Michaels

We might as well get this out of the way up front: if you were among those who were hoping against hope that Mikael Åkerfeldt would steer the band back towards death metal on Pale Communion, you’re going to be very disappointed, because Pale Communion completes the transformation begun on 2011’s Heritage. It’s time to accept it—Opeth is no longer a death metal band. And this is a very good thing.

Category: Album Reviews

Tags: Opeth, progressive metal, prog rock, mellotron, Goblin, Mikael, Åkerfeldt, Crosby, Stills & Nash
Posted Friday, August 29, 2014 - 2:28pm by Darin Tambascio
Electric Wurms album cover

Electric Wurms features Steven Drozd and Wayne Coyne switching roles with Drozd on lead vocals (among other things) and Coyne playing bass, while members of Nashville psychedelic/experimental group Linear Downfall round out the group. Throughout Musik, die Schwer zu Twerk (which is Google translation of "music, that's hard to twerk to" in German), Drozd and company write songs similar to the Flaming Lips style of noisy psych rock but with more krautrock and progressive rock influences.

Category: Album Reviews

Tags: Flaming Lips, Linear Downfall, krautrock, Can, Kraftwerk, Yes, Steven Drodz, Wayne Coyne, prog, progressive rock, psychedelic rock
Posted Thursday, August 28, 2014 - 8:20pm by Clayton Michaels

The Great Wall’s sound is more like Intronaut-meets-mathcore with a few electronic elements thrown in for good measure, but with vocals that are almost crooned. The end result is a heavily textured take on alt-metal that’s both proggy and accessible. On paper it might seem a bit incongruous, but in practice it’s pretty damn wonderful. It’s also not really like anything I’ve ever heard before, which is saying something.

Category: Album Reviews

Tags: The Great Wall, intronaut, progressive metal, alt-metal, mathcore, electronica
Posted Wednesday, August 27, 2014 - 4:26pm by Gabriel Riccio

In my last post, I did an in-depth analysis of the title track from King Crimson’s Discipline. I’d recommend reading that before delving into this one.

Category: Musicians Corner

Tags: King Crimson, Discipline, Three of a Perfect Pair, Beat, Neal and Jack and Me, '80s, Robert Fripp, Adrian Belew, Tony Levin, Bill Bruford, Analysis, Trey Gunn, Pat Mastelotto
Posted Thursday, August 21, 2014 - 8:08pm by Clayton Michaels

How best to describe Trioscapes? The trio, which is rounded out by tenor saxman/flautist Walter Fancourt and drummer Matt Lynch, are first and foremost a jazz combo, and they lean more toward the Miles Davis end of the spectrum than the Mahavishnu Orchestra end. Album opener “Digital Dream Sequence” and “Hysteria” both have some really nice hard bop moments interspersed with some seriously heavy fuzz bass. “From Earth to Moon” brings to mind Rashaan Roland Kirk with its flute and what sounds like a marimba sections. The highlight of the album, though, is the 15+ minute closing track “The Jungle,” which builds from gentle electronic percussion and an intricately tapped bass line into a full-on free/fusion freak-out and then back out again, with a particularly nice bass solo roughly halfway through the song.

Category: Album Reviews

Tags: hard bop, Miles Davis, Dan Briggs, Between the Buried and Me, Trioscapes, jazz fusion

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